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Construction Career Pathways: “Looking for the road to success? Build it yourself.”

With winter approaching, Minnesota’s other season—road construction—will soon wrap up for the year. But when it comes to the road to success, construction is always underway. And while there will be pitfalls and detours along this road, it’s navigable with the right tools.

Especially when the right tools are literally, tools.

Thanks to Construction Career Pathways (CCP) and its partnering programs, Minnesota’s youth can begin exploring successful career opportunities in construction as early as middle school, develop skills through a registered apprenticeship program in high school, and conclude with a rock-solid career in the building trades.

CCP uses video and cleverly worded messaging to highlight the benefits of the construction industry and show young people construction includes everything from pipefitters to cabinet makers and operating engineers to sheet metal workers.

We are looking for people with ironclad character. This country wasn’t built by cubicle dwellers. Here are reasons to consider a career in the trades:

  1. Less student debt: In four years you could earn $144,000 or go into debt with thousands of dollars in student loans.
  2. It’s challenging: The Construction Building Trades are going green and using the latest in technology innovation to build our communities.
  3. Sense of pride: Each year members of the Minnesota Building Trades community from across the state donate their time and expertise to those in need.
  4. The money is good: Construction workers in Minnesota make over $27/hour on average, well above the national average.
  5. You’ll get fit: You’ll build muscle and your community at the same time.

Construction-related positions are in-demand careers in Minnesota. As the Center’s “No Four-Year Degree Required” report shows, these trades lead to high lifetime earnings, often exceeding the expected lifetime earnings for the median bachelor’s degree holder. We encourage young people who like working with their hands to look into these fields and consider pursuing a career in this lucrative and exciting industry. Don’t just look for the road to success, build it!

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