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Unearthing Scholastic Seriousness with Back-Boned Courage in St. Paul?

The Star Tribune ran a story Friday (February 22) headlined, “St. Paul Students Push Ethnic Studies as Core Classwork.”  Featured terms included “culturally relevant curriculum that teaches history through the lens of the oppressed”; “empowering of students to ‘develop into agents for justice in their communities’”; celebrating students’ “identity and ethnicity,” and the old reliable “strengthening self-esteem.” According to reporter Anthony Lonetree, Minneapolis Public Schools offer similar electives, but not required core courses, as is proposed in St. Paul. It would be easy – too easy – to dismiss the St. Paul effort, which is led by a student group called “SPPS...

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Hard to Fathom Male and Female Graduation Rates

I went looking for certain education statistics the other day but found more interesting data along the way. It has come to be commonly understood that American girls are doing better than America boys in virtually every education (and noneducation) category, with the same holding true for young women compared to young men.  This is particularly the case regarding college graduation rates.  But until one sees most recently available numbers, I’m guessing most people don’t come close to grasping the size these gaps. The following estimated data, for the 2016-17 academic year, are from the National Center for Education Statistics and can...

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Teachers’ Union Wish List? $4 Billion More from “the Rich.”

Taxpayers and smart lawmakers should remind Gov. Walz and their colleagues in the Legislature that Minnesotans from all walk of life have choices, and they can vote with their feet, taking their income and wealth with them. Let's instead come up with a budget plan that honors the hard work of all taxpayers by wisely spending the taxes they already send to St. Paul. ...

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What Elizabeth Warren Could Have Taught Marco Defunis

As you read the blog below, keep in mind how Sen. Elizabeth Warren declared herself to be an American Indian when she thought Harvard Law School would thereby afford her extra consideration, perhaps even points. The first big affirmative action case in higher education to reach the U.S. Supreme Court was not the famous Bakke case in 1978 but the less-well-known Defunis case in 1974.  For those who don’t recall it (or somehow didn’t write a dissertation about affirmative action in the academy in 1980), Marco Defunis’s application for admission to the University of Washington law school was originally rejected.  He...

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