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Teachers’ Union Makes PAC Refund Process Tricky. But Don’t Get Spooked, Request it Today.

Education Minnesota—the state’s teachers’ union—has not been shy about its efforts to bolster the Democratic Party. Through campaign spending and organizational muscle, the union has “dedicated” itself to “help get out the vote” for the election this fall and ensure educators know which candidates Education Minnesota has endorsed (hint: all but one are from the same party). Should members wish to not fund the political left, they must fill out a “PAC Refund Request” form and mail it to Education Minnesota postmarked by October 31 (today). ...

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Education Minnesota is Fully Engaged in the Mid-Term; Raised Dues and PAC Contribution to Fund GOTV Campaign at K-12 Schools

The Star Tribune’s Erin Golden, who covers the education and teachers’ union beat, wrote an article about how the union is aggressively asking teachers to vote and encourage their students to vote. “Education Minnesota’s election strategy: Get more teachers to vote: In high-stakes election, Education Minnesota is focusing on its own members,” October 27, 2018. The article also talked about how hard it is for union members to get PAC and Foundation money back. Here are some excerpts, in case you cannot access the article here: Outside the door to Linda Hagen’s third-grade classroom at Turtle Lake Elementary in Shoreview, there’s a sign that...

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Education Minnesota: The Union Forces Members to Fund PAC, Makes it Hard to Get Refund

Each year Education Minnesota charges members $25.00 for its political action committee or “PAC.” PAC money is spent on political parties (OK mostly one party), candidates and other political funds. Then it makes members ask for a refund. And makes it hard to get one. This arrangement is disrespectful of members and imposes an unreasonable burden on the constitutional right of teachers and ESPs not to fund a union PAC. The legislature needs to fix this. ...

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Breaking News: Tech Giants are Biased

Several videos have surfaced that make it clear, in case anyone needed video proof, that the tech giants are led by left-leaning titans that have contempt for at least a half of its U.S. customer base.Yes, and it begs for a market solution, ideally not regulation but given the monopoly enjoyed by Facebook and the ubiquitous nature of the giants, this one is going to be a puzzle. I will get the Center interns working on it!...

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Teachers: You do not have to meet with a union rep before resigning this week.

Minnesota teachers who are choosing to exercise their First Amendment rights and resign from union membership are being told that they need to meet with their local union official before they can opt-out. A meeting is not required under the law, teaching contract, or under the union membership card. Your decision to opt-out is a private decision, and you are under no obligation to meet with anyone to discuss your decision....

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Union Executive and Staff Pay Far Exceeds Teachers; State Union Dues Increase Again

Denise Specht, President of Education Minnesota makes over $206,000 a year. Specht's gross salary increased $5,794 in 2016. Almost 70 executives and other staff at Education Minnesota make over $100,000 in salary. State dues have gone up by $7; dues range from $650 to $1,400. There were 6,534 reported agency fee payers in 2017....

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American Experiment event celebrating free speech protected by police while police union protested outside

The Teamsters are certified under the law to represent police officers all over the state. The Center had to hire police to protect us while the Center and our guests exercised our right to gather and speak. We had to hire police to protect us from possible interruptions, or worse, from the police union and other public-sector unions and protesters. ...

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Public unions: Navigating new era of opting in rather than opting out

Let's look at how the Supreme Court's Janus decision may affect public employees who have been paying full union dues.  This op-ed originally appeared in the Star Tribune on September 15, 2018. It is back-to-school time for teachers and education support professionals (ESPs), but is it back to the union, as well? At the end of June, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that forcing public employees to fund a union as a condition of employment violated their First Amendment rights. That long-anticipated decision in Janus vs. AFSCME had immediate financial consequences for Minnesota’s public-sector unions and some employees. Across Minnesota, government employers stopped...

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“Happy Constitution Day, if You Can Keep It: The long-term survival of the Founders’ design depends on people, not parchment.”

The Center is celebrating the Constitution today by hosting Mark and Rebecca and their legal victory in June (Janus v. Afscme) at a luncheon in Minneapolis; they fought for and won the right of public employees to choose for themselves whether to pay dues to a union.We have been told that Teamsters are going to show up to protest this First Amendment victory. While I have some thoughts about a union that represents our women and men in blue using union dues to protest the Janus case, I note today that our great country honors and defends our right to...

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Instant Pay Raise: How to Leave Your Public Employee Union

Mark Janus and Rebecca Friedrichs will be in the Twin Cities on Monday to discuss their role in the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that public employee unions cannot force government workers to pay union fees as a condition of employment. Tickets to the American Experiment noon forum at the Downtown Minneapolis Hilton remain available. But anyone interested in a sneak preview of what to expect should check out the column in today's Star Tribune by American Experiment policy fellow and general counsel Kim Crockett. It is back-to-school time for teachers and education support professionals (ESPs), but is it back to the...

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