fbpx

Latest Posts

Home

Facebook

Twitter

Search
About

Wisconsin Consumer Protection Group Say Focus on Electric Bills Instead of Rates Obscures High Cost of Electricity: What Can Minnesota Learn?

The Wisconsin Citizens Utility Board, which protects families and small businesses from increasing electricity prices, said the focus on bills instead of prices obscure the fact that the state has the highest electricity prices in the Midwest. Unfortunately, renewable energy advocates in Minnesota use the same sleight of hand to try and persuade the general public that the state's $15 billion dollar investment in unreliable wind power has not caused electricity prices to skyrocket. This is simply is not true....

Continue reading

New Great Plains Institute Study Hides the High Cost of Reducing CO2 Emissions

Advocates of reducing CO2 emissions from electricity generation have released a new study attempting to show the necessary steps to make 13 states CO2-free in the Midwest. Unfortunately, the study, released by the Great Plains Institute, failed to mention the massive cost of doing so. Renewable energy advocates like to pretend wind energy is the lowest-cost source of electricity. Yet, for Minnesotans, electric bills have increased 26 percent faster than the national average as we have added more wind and solar to the grid. According to the study, renewables would have to increase their energy share dramatically. Renewables currently provide 11 percent of...

Continue reading

Power Outages in Texas: What Minnesota Can Learn

In recent years, the electrical grid in Texas (ERCOT) has had moments of almost utter collapse. In 2008, a storm swept through the state causing a large amount of wind capacity to rapidly go off-grid when electricity demand was highest. The grid’s frequency suddenly dropped, leaving many residents without power for up to four hours. This occurred when wind energy was responsible for merely 4 percent of Texas’s electricity generation. It happened again in 2011 when record low temperatures in Texas resulted in record high energy demand. The information we do get from these outages is crucial for understanding how...

Continue reading

Summer Issue of Thinking Minnesota is out

The just-released summer issue of Thinking Minnesota makes a compelling case for how allowing more mining in northern Minnesota would give Minnesota’s economy a potent shot in the arm. In the cover story, Center policy fellows used a sophisticated economic modeling program to conclude that increased mining will produce 8500 jobs and bring in $3.7 billion to the state’s economy. On top of that Minnesotans appear to agree. In a related article, the quarterly Thinking Minnesota poll shows that Minnesotans agree. When told that mining would add $3.4 billion to the economy and create thousands of Minnesota jobs, respondents’ support for...

Continue reading

Media Warns Pipeline Chaos Could be Coming to MN

The national media has already written the first chapter of a potentially protracted standoff in northern Minnesota over the recently approved Enbridge 3 pipeline. The Wall Street Journal warns that environmental extremists intend to make a last stand over the pipeline that promises to bring well-paying jobs and economic prosperity to some of the poorest counties in the state. Weeks after Minnesota regulators approved the replacement of an oil pipeline that crosses the state, Native American and environmental groups are starting to oppose the project with a similar playbook to a failed effort to stop the Dakota Access pipeline. Winona LaDuke, who...

Continue reading

Minnesota’s Goal for 80% Carbon Reductions by 2050 will be Expensive – and Xcel Agrees

Current policies in Minnesota require the state to reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent from 2005 levels by 2050. This will not only require the addition of renewable energy sources into energy markets but will also involve prematurely retiring coal plants that provide low-cost electricity, building significant transmission lines, investing in battery storage technology, and constructing more natural gas plants to “back-up” wind and solar energy sources when they cannot produce electricity. In other words, achieving 80 percent reductions by 2050 will completely change the state’s energy market – and it will be costly. But don’t just take my word for it. Xcel...

Continue reading