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Do mandatory fees trap students into supporting groups they don’t agree with?

Mandatory student fees to support campus groups are a common practice at many colleges and universities. But lawmakers in Wisconsin and Minnesota want to give students the right to “opt out of required fees that go to clubs and causes with which they disagree,” as reported by the Washington Post. They [lawmakers] say their proposals would give students the right to vote their consciences when choosing how their money is divided up—and would slow the growth of student fees. [caption id="attachment_8291" align="aligncenter" width="510"] Source: Minnesota Daily[/caption] University of Minnesota Twin Cities students pay $436.60 in Student Service Fees per semester if they are registered...

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Parental Choice is Working: Why are the teachers’ union and Hollywood attacking charter schools?

Charter schools are the “polite cousins of segregation,” in the words of Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers. Last year the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People called for a moratorium on charters. Film festivals are screening “Backpack Full of Cash,” a pro-union documentary narrated by Matt Damon that portrays charters as separate and unequal institutions....

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Do teachers oppose or support forced union dues?

I have no doubt that most teachers are dedicated professionals who just want to teach—and like the mean girls we all knew in school, that it is a small minority of teachers bullying and enforcing a trade union mentality that is making teachers miserable and creating a hostile environment for the free exchange of ideas. Let’s win that basic freedom back for teachers and our schools. ...

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Will Minnesota be a right to work state by next June?

In 1977, the U.S. Supreme Court did something courts often do: instead of doing its job and ruling on the law, the Court split the baby, acting like a legislative body instead of a court. It crafted a law for the whole country that has warped our electoral and legislative process beyond recognition. Congress does not get off the hook here. It long ago could have—and still should-- force government unions to be fully transparent with how they spend union dues. But Congress is too afraid of the unions. Will the Court clean up its own mess?...

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It is pledge time at MPR: Why I am not a member of NPR/MPR (again this year)

Why are taxpayers forced to pay for government radio? Here is one example, of many, why taxpayer funding should be declared unconstitutional. This exchange about Obamacare was not reporting; it was commentary parading as reporting. And the pampered intelligentsia at NPR are so convinced of their righteousness, so lost in the beltway, that they could not hide their hysteria or breathless opposition to any rollback of Obamacare. ...

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WSJ Reader reacts to Education Minnesota: It’s all about the money (and the power)

Numbers to explain why the teachers' union Education Minnesota wants to make it next-to-impossible for state teachers to avoid paying union dues: Total compensation of Education Minnesota President Denise Specht (2015): $194,745; Number of Education Minnesota employees with total compensation of $100,000+ (2015): 68 ...

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Employee Freedom Update: Who are Mark Janus and Rebecca Friedrichs?

Who are Mark Janus and Rebecca Friedrichs? And why did I write about them in The Wall Street Journal today? If the Supreme Court rules in Janus’ favor, every government employee across the country will have the right to choose for himself or herself whether to give money to a union. This is equivalent to Minnesota passing a right-to-work constitutional amendment-- only better because it will be the law of land. ...

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A Constitutional Right to Kneel? No, Actually

With Thursday Night Football kicking off shortly, the prospect of NFL players refusing to stand for the National Anthem is again in the news. When the issue is debated, it is common for observers on both sides to say that the players have a constitutional right, under the First Amendment, to kneel, sit down, or whatever. This actually is not correct. Under the First Amendment, players have a right not to be punished by the government for kneeling. Professor Teresa Stanton Collett of St. Thomas Law School makes the point: I don't watch football. I don't care about football. But I...

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Supreme Court agrees to hear First Amendment Case: A Victory would end Public Employee Unions’ Monopoly Power

If Janus wins, unionized public employees in non-right-to-work states like Illinois and Minnesota will be able to keep their jobs, even if they do not join or financially support the union. The result could be a significant decrease in public employee union membership, millions of dollars less revenue from dues and fees and further erosion of organized labor’s political clout at the state and national level. ...

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Is Minnesota Nice? Not If You Are a Conservative

To my knowledge, this story has gotten no local attention. But it ought to be of concern to all Minnesotans, especially given that it involves the flagship Minneapolis campus of the University of Minnesota. A national outlet, the Daily Beast, found it newsworthy: "A Campus Conservative’s Year Facing Anger, Doxing and Intimidation." Madison Faupel...

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