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The Biggest Incentive for Solar in Minnesota

Did you know that the biggest subsidy for solar is hidden on your electric bill? While Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives are trying to extend the federal solar subsidies, here in Minnesota, a policy called net metering serves as the biggest stealth subsidy that solar receives. The impact of this sizable subsidy was spelled out in a recent article in the Mankato Free Press, although I don't think the reporter realized this at the time. The piece begins with a feel-good story of an insurance company that put solar panels on their roof: "Thomas Rekstein no longer minds looking at the...

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Solar Panels Produce Tons of Toxic Waste—Literally

There is a growing public awareness that so-called environmentally friendly energy sources like wind turbines and solar panels aren't so environmentally friendly, after all. Whether it be thousands of non-recyclable wind turbine blades arriving at landfills, or the growing recognition that solar panels contain toxic heavy metals that can pose a risk to the environment should they leak out of the panels, the environmental costs of "renewable" energy are becoming more clear everyday. The article below was originally written by Bill Wirtz at the Foundation for Economic Freedom (FEE): Solar panels have been heralded as the alternative to fossil fuels for decades....

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Expiring Subsidies, Not Free Markets, Driving Minnesota Solar Growth

Renewable energy advocates often claim that business is booming for the solar industry in Minnesota, and this is true. However, in order to determine whether this is a good or bad thing for Minnesota residents, it is important to understand why this is the case. A recent article suggests the recent demand in solar development is happening because people want to cash in on the federal solar subsidies before the tax credits taper off over the next five years. According to an article in the Rochester Post Bulletin: "When Steve and Dawn Finnie opened Little Thistle Brewing Co., they had long-term plans...

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11 Ways Minnesota Families Are Subsidizing Solar

There is a pervasive fiction that solar is somehow lower cost than other sources of electricity and that this form of energy is competing on a level playing field with sources like coal, nuclear, and natural gas. This notion is a complete fairy tale. Unfortunately, there are a host of renewable energy advocacy groups, some of them who pretend to be conservative, who further this notion and even contend that wind and solar are somehow at a disadvantage relative to more reliable forms of energy due to government intervention. Nothing could be further than the truth. Solar and wind have all...

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Like It Or Not, You’re Paying $2.6 Million For Brooklyn Park’s Solar Panels

Brooklyn Park made headlines earlier this week after announcing the completion of their 6,000 solar panel project. The City claims they will now operate on 100 percent "clean energy," even though this is patently false. Furthermore, their mayor, Jeff Lunde, even bragged that the City paid nothing for the solar panels. Of course, all that means is that you are paying the $2.6 million price tag for Brooklyn Park's new solar panels, whether you like it or not. 100 Percent Renewable is 100 Percent Baloney Although the media is claiming the solar installation will make Brooklyn Park 100 percent renewable, it actually won't.  As...

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State Doles Out Even More Money For Solar Power

The State of Minnesota has gifted more taxpayer dollars to the solar industry. This time the subsidies take the form of a $3.5 million dollar state loan package that was used to restart the production of solar panels at a Mountain Iron manufacturing facility. The plant was previously occupied by the solar company Silicon Energy, before it went bankrupt after the first round of solar subsidies, dubbed "Made in Minnesota," expired in 2017. In fact, nearly all of the companies who participated in the program have closed their facilities in the state or gone out of business. So why is the state...

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