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The Case for a Green ‘No Deal’

Those who advocate for Minnesota's "Green New Deal" are not the adults in the room. How can one credibly claim that global warming is an "existential crisis,"  yet refuse to utilize the most reliable, affordable, and scaleable sources of carbon-dioxide free electricity available? I submit that they cannot. But do we need to make a Green New Deal at all? The following article argues that we do not....

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In The Tank (EP186) – Artificially Inflated Green Jobs Numbers, Geoengineering, Tax Freedom Day, and Lindsey Stroud on Vaping

Hello! In the first segment, Isaac gives us a rundown on how "clean energy job creation numbers [are] artificially inflated." In an effort to pass off renewable energy mandates as a potential job creator, advocates suggest renewable energy is responsible for thousands of jobs. Isaac reveals why this idea is "bunk." Next, the trio talk about the idea of geoengineering. A Reason Foundation article titled "New Research Suggests Solar Geoengineering Could Safely Lower Global Temperatures," makes the case that we should be able to discuss and experiment with these theories. Supplemental article: 7 Geoengineering Solutions That Might Cause More Damage Than Good Moving on...

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Minnesota Citizen’s Utility Board Harms Ratepayers By Advocating For Bad Policy

It is clear that the Citizens Utility Board is either unwilling or unable to advocate for the policies that will actually reduce costs for consumers. Center of the American Experiment is the leading advocate for energy consumers in Minnesota, and we can say that utilizing Minnesota's existing coal-fired power plants for the foreseeable future is the single-best way to keep our energy bills low, not adding unreliable and expensive sources like wind and solar. ...

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The Dirty Little Secret Behind Clean Energy Jobs

The Clean Energy Economy Minnesota jobs report will likely draw favorable media coverage, but a deeper look at the numbers exposes the fact that these numbers are artificially inflated by including workers who are only tangentially related to energy efficiency, and that only 2.2 percent of the wind and solar jobs are non-temporary construction jobs....

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MN Commerce Department Commissioner Kelly Tips His Hand: “Carbon Free” Still Means No New Nuclear

If Governor Walz really believes that climate change is an existential threat, why would he refuse to legalize the most reliable, affordable, and permanent source of electricity that does not emit carbon dioxide emissions? The fact that is not even willing to advocate for repealing Minnesota's ban on new nuclear power plants that has been in effect since 1994 means Governor Walz is not the adult in the room, no matter how me may try to position himself as the realist on environmental issues. ...

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Walz’s Comments on Public Utilities Commission Appointment is an Ominous Sign for Line 3, Rational Energy Policy

Line 3 opponents often argue the Governor should deep-six the oil pipeline replacement project because it would lock in oil use for the foreseeable future when we should, in reality be transitioning away from oil in favor of electric cars. But these arguments are pure wishful thinking with no basis in reality....

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No, Wind Capacity Factors Are Not 50 Percent in Minnesota, And That’s Very Important

Renewable energy advocates in Minnesota often claim that capacity factors for wind, the percentage of electricity generated by a power plant compared to its theoretical output, are sky high in Minnesota, exceeding the 50 percent threshold. Data from the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs show this claim is completely false. As you can see on the map below, there is not a single wind facility in Minnesota that operates above a 50 percent capacity factor.  The results don't get much better as we lower our standards, either. The U.S. Energy Information Administration shows the state-wide capacity factor for wind was only 35.9 percent in...

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