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Midwestern Wind Turbines Were 3 Percent Useful Last Weekend

I hope you all enjoyed your weekend. No matter what you did, it was probably more productive than the wind turbines in the Midcontinent Independent Systems Operator (MISO) territory, where the wind utilized just 3 percent of installed capacity, providing a mere 1 percent of the electricity available on the grid. But just because the wind wasn't blowing doesn't mean there was not a high demand for electricity. In fact, July and August are typically the months where electricity use in Minnesota is highest. Ironically, it is also when generation from wind is lowest. The chart below shows Energy Information Administration data for...

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Isaac Orr: Minnesota’s High Electric Bills Will Continue to Rise Higher

This article originally appeared in today's Pioneer Press. The version below is the same text, but with graphics added. Xcel Energy recently unveiled its plan to prematurely retire its coal plants and replace them with billions of dollars’ worth of wind, solar, and most importantly, natural gas. Unfortunately, Xcel’s plan will constitute a large increase in electricity costs for Minnesota families, businesses and schools, and these costs would far exceed any potential environmental benefit. Many people may not realize that Minnesota residential electric bills reached a new all-time high in 2018. In fact, these bills exceeded $103 per month for the first time ever...

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Navy Times: Coal is the Most Reliable Source of Electricity for Our Military

Yesterday I wrote about how oil, not wind and solar, is the most important source of energy for our military. Today I'd like to delve deeper into the electricity sector because having access to reliable electricity is incredibly important for our military, especially as technology continues to play a larger and larger role in keeping America safe. Renewable energy advocates sometimes argue that wind and solar make our country safer, but it is hard to imagine any way that intermittent, unreliable sources of electricity could meaningfully improve our national security in a way that coal, natural gas, and nuclear power cannot. The reason...

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American Frackers, Not Wind and Solar, Increase Our National Security

America has the strongest military might in the world. We have 3,476 tactical aircraft, 760 attack helicopters, 637 unmanned drones, 157 bombers, 2,831 tanks, 93 cruisers, destroyers, and frigates, 10 aircraft carriers, 68 submarines, 31 amphibious ships, and probably more supply trucks than you can shake a stick at. The one thing these military vehicles have in common? They ain't running on wind and solar. They're running on oil. In fact, the United States military is the single-largest consumer of oil in the world, using more than 100 million barrels every single year. Fortunately, the oil used to keep America safe is...

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Xcel Energy CEO Made $26.2 Million in 2018 As Your Electric Bill Reached a New All-Time High

The Star Tribune recently ran a piece announcing that Xcel Energy CEO Ben Fowke was the third-highest paid CEO in Minnesota in 2018 with a total pay of $26.2 million for the year. This wouldn't necessarily be outrageous compensation if Xcel Energy were a private company competing for your businesses in a free market, but the fact that Xcel customers are literally forced by the government to buy their electricity from the  government-approved monopoly makes this level of compensation unconscionable. Why does the Xcel CEO get paid so much? According to the Star Tribune: "Fowke’s annual bonus is based on five factors: employee...

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What is the ‘Conservative Energy Network’ and Why is it Backed by Leftist Funders?

There is big money behind promoting wind and solar power. After all, the only reasons people build wind turbines and solar panels are because of government subsidies, state-level renewable energy mandates, and government-approved monopoly utility companies, like Xcel Energy, who build them because it allows them to increase their corporate profits. In essence, there would be zero market for wind and solar if the government were not involved, and this fact means that renewable energy companies are willing to spend massive amounts of money to influence public policy. It makes perfect sense, their very existence depends on government policies. Unfortunately,  some so-called...

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Flanagan and Senjem To View The German Energy Failure Firsthand

Tomorrow, Lt. Governor Peggy Flanagan and State Senator Dave Senjem, along with several other members of a Minnesota delegation including Jessica Hellman, Steve Kelley, and members of the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission head to Germany for a weeklong visit that will include an  energy seminar. I wrote about this last week but it bears repeating: Germany energy policy is a failure by every objective metric and we should not copy their bad policies here. Today I'm posting a blog post that highlights these failures in a new way. Many advocates of renewable energy point to Germany as the example of how to...

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Will Peggy Flanagan View German Energy Policy as As The Failure That It Is?

On July 12, Lt. Governor Peggy Flanagan will be jet-setting off to Germany to learn about sustainable energy, according to the Star Tribune. This makes me wonder, will the Lt. Governor and the delegation she is leading realize what a spectacular failure the German energy experiment has become while there? The failure of the German Energiewende, as they call it, is becoming obvious throughout the entire world. Germany has spent more than $580 billion on renewables, experienced skyrocketing electricity prices, and failed to make any meaningful reductions in CO2 emissions since 2008. Oh, and the country plans to burn coal for electricity...

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Most Canadians Unwilling to Pay Much for Carbon Tax: Poll

The following article originally appeared in the Toronto Sun: The majority of Canadians support battling climate change but don’t want to cough up more than $200 a year in carbon tax. Think-tank SecondStreet.org hired polling company Nanos Research to conduct the poll that found 47.5% of Canadians are willing to pay $100 or less a year in carbon tax. Another 7.7% would pay $101-$200 annually. If the 13.1% of respondents who answered “unsure” are excluded from the results 54.7% of Canadians are not willing to pay over $100 for the tax. One thousand Canadians 18 or older participated in the survey. Most past polls on the carbon tax have studied...

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