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On this 2-Year Janus Anniversary: American Experiment continues to fight for workplace freedom

Two years ago on June 27, the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Janus v. AFSCME freed millions of public employees from being forced to subsidize government unions’ political agendas in order to keep their job. Since then, Center of the American Experiment has been helping Minnesotans fight for their newly restored right to say no to financially supporting government unions through our workplace freedom projects—Employee Freedom MN and Educated Teachers MN—and by connecting public employees with legal resources through the Upper Midwest Law Center (UMLC)....

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Criminal Justice: A new option for felons seeking redemption

Early mentoring — and a job prospect — can help offenders re-enter society. This op-ed originally appeared in the Star Tribune on February 24, 2020.  [Photo by Rich Pedroncelli, Associated Press.] When well-educated and often well-heeled political players, under investigation for one reason or another, are cleared of possible criminal charges (or released from prison if they’ve already been there) chances are pretty good they will find ways of earning a decent living again. If they’re attorneys and haven’t been disbarred, they can practice law. If they have been disbarred, or if they are not lawyers to begin with, it’s easy to see...

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U.S. Supreme Court hears high-stakes school choice case

Today the U.S. Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments in a case that could greatly impact the role private schools play in the school choice debate. Three Montana mothers are asking the High Court to uphold a state tax credit program that supports low-income students looking to attend private schools of their choice....

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This is a Whopper: Minnesota’s HQ2 Amazon bid was lost in the Cloud.

Minnesota’s HQ2 bid is subject to transparency laws. So why didn’t the State release the bid back in 2017? Apparently, Governor Dayton did not think taxpayers had the right to see what was promised to Amazon. When a small non-profit (Public Record Media) sued to get a copy of the bid, the State claimed that it did not possess a copy of the bid. ...

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What Elizabeth Warren Could Have Taught Marco Defunis

As you read the blog below, keep in mind how Sen. Elizabeth Warren declared herself to be an American Indian when she thought Harvard Law School would thereby afford her extra consideration, perhaps even points. The first big affirmative action case in higher education to reach the U.S. Supreme Court was not the famous Bakke case in 1978 but the less-well-known Defunis case in 1974.  For those who don’t recall it (or somehow didn’t write a dissertation about affirmative action in the academy in 1980), Marco Defunis’s application for admission to the University of Washington law school was originally rejected.  He...

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Court Backs Climate Change and Calls for More Protests

There's no law against grandstanding in court, but that doesn't make it right. Take the case of John Schulte, a Duluth judicial referee who saw the trial of three climate protesters as a platform to deliver his personal verdict on global warming. To his credit, Schulte found the three defendants who chained themselves to a Duluth Wells Fargo bank entrance to prevent it from opening earlier this year guilty of trespassing, fining them $135 apiece. Yet after that slap on the wrist, the court gave th protesters a pat on the back and virtual pep talk, according to the Duluth News...

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Title IX: What was it meant to do and the nightmare it has become

Can Title IX statutory language be interpreted to empower colleges and universities to essentially act like police, investigators, judges and juries? Congress should revisit Title IX to pull these corrupting police power from our colleges and universities. Federal dollars should u[lift and protect our students and faculty not subject them to nightmarish prosecutions. ...

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Justice Kavanaugh Sits: What does it mean for Roe v. Wade?

Collins assured the Senate, and her constituents, that Kavanaugh viewed Roe v. Wade as settled law. By leading the call for Kavanaugh’s confirmation, she has insured that the Court will not take up cases, or at least be reluctant, to take up cases, that get anywhere near overturning Roe. The Chief Justice will probably even avoid cases that expand state regulations of abortion, at least in the near future....

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Sweeping lawsuit would create a general mess

An activist court ruling. Metrowide racial balancing of schools. An end to local control. Sum total?  This Sunday Cover Op-ed appeared in the Star Tribune on October 7, 2018. On July 25, the Minnesota Supreme Court issued a ruling with far-reaching and troubling consequences for K-12 education in our state. The court determined that a lawsuit titled Cruz-Guzman vs. State of Minnesota and whose plaintiffs seek court-ordered metrowide racial balancing in the Twin Cities region’s public schools, can go forward. The case will now return to district court, where plaintiffs will push for a sweeping plan to sort metro-area students — including those...

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