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National Teachers’ Union Claim of No Members Lost Day After Janus is Misleading

As the one-year anniversary of Janus v. AFSCME approaches, the national teachers’ union AFT (American Federation of Teachers) recently made a misleading claim about the case’s impact on union membership. Photo of AFT President Randi Weingarten by AP/Andrew Harnik...

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True Teacher Appreciation: Respect for educators’ voice and choice

Teacher Appreciation Week officially kicked off today, May 6 and will run through May 10. In order to better support teachers, unions need to listen to their voices and restore respect for their choices. The freedom to say "no" to a union is just as important as the freedom to say "yes" to one. ...

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Poll: 1 in 3 teachers want to negotiate salary & benefits for themselves

More than one-third of teachers would prefer to negotiate salary and benefits for themselves, according to a national survey by the Teacher Freedom project. The survey asked 2,000 teachers in the 22 states most impacted by Janus v. AFSCME, including Minnesota, for their thoughts on contract negotiations and benefits, unions, and union dues....

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Supreme Court’s Janus ruling should apply to union members, too

After the Janus decision at the U.S. Supreme Court, the state of Minnesota ordered all public employers to stop deducting “fair-share” fees from nonmember paychecks. But the state was silent about union members who had previously signed a union membership card authorizing the deduction of dues. Did Janus affect union members, too? Although Janus dealt directly with nonmembers who paid a “fair-share” fee, the court’s reasoning applies to union members, as well. ...

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Pension Omnibus Bill Increases General Fund Contributions to City of Minneapolis; Makes Bailout to Local Government Fund Permanent

The 2018 bill was supposed to immediately and miraculously drop the unfunded liability by billions while lowering the assumed rate of return and solve the funding crisis “for the next 30 years.” The problem is that lawmakers reached a political compromise, which is what elected officials do, but pensions are a mathematical and actuarial puzzle that is immune to political fixes. ...

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